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By In Do the Math, Health Savings Accounts (HSAs), Savings and Budgets

An HSA Really Can Be a ‘Dream-Vacation’ Reserve Account…If You’re Smart About It

We’ve written extensively about how much you might end up spending on your own health care in retirement and, as a result, why it’s important to build up your HSA funds so that you can have that reserve of tax-free dollars for such expenses.

But, as a former co-worker of mine used to say, here’s a “super-secret hack” about HSAs that may change the way you spend both in retirement and beforehand: there is no time limit on when you can reimburse yourself from your HSA for medical expenses.

What does this SSH (ahem, super-secret hack!) mean for your retirement savings? It’s simple. Keep reading…

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By In Featured, General Benefits Knowledge, Health Insurance, Voluntary Benefits

Advice for My Daughter on Selecting First Employee Benefits

Over on his personal blog, Platform for Good, our cofounder Shawn has written an excellent post on the advice he gave his daughter as she readied to select benefits through her employer for the first time. It’s chock-full of insights from an adult life spent contemplating how to make the best choices for your present and your future, organized into five helpful tips for making your benefits choices. Get on over there and give it a read!

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By In Around the Web, Money-Saving Tips

What Trump’s Price Transparency EO Means for FIRE

Earlier this week, President Trump announced an Executive Order requiring health care companies, particularly hospitals and insurers, to make their negotiated prices for services publicly available. Trump said, with his trademark understatement:

“This is a truly historic day. I don’t know if it will be covered that way by the fake news, but this is truly a historic day this is a very big thing that is happening right now and it’s pretty much going to blow everything away.”

President Donald Trump, signing the Executive Order on Improving Price and Quality Transparency in American Healthcare to Put Patients First, June 24 2019

Since then, there’s been a slew of coverage about whether this order will have quite that impact. The hardcore health economists have been talking about Danish cement (seriously) in saying that forcing hospitals to publish what they’ve negotiated with health insurers to pay for services will simply encourage the ones charging the least to raise their prices. I personally asked an economist if the airline industry might be a better comparison, with its major players, barriers to entry and regional differences in supply and demand. Here’s what he sent me:

Here’s what this Executive Order on transparency could mean for the FI community: ultimately, smart and active consumers do better when they have more information, so this’ll be good for FI. Duh.

But health care has nuances—many, many nuances.

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By In Health Savings Accounts (HSAs), Retirement Investment Accounts

Investing Your HSA Funds

In spite of being the fabled “triple-tax advantage” and therefore an ideal account for investing for your retirement, only a fraction of those with HSA’s actually invest the money.

Having worked on the business side of HSAs for a good number of years, I can tell you that there are three main reasons for these low investment rates:

  1. People are actively spending their HSA funds. They have medical expenses, or think they might, and are using their HSA debit card as the name would imply — to pay those expenses if and when they arise.
  2. People think they’ll need to actively spend their HSA funds. They don’t have medical expenses but think there might be a need to have the funds close at hand, just in case.
  3. People have no idea how to invest their HSA funds, or if they even can.

No. 1 is understandable. If you’re sick and/or you’re living paycheck to paycheck, that tax-preferred account will stretch your health care dollar.

No. 2 also makes sense to a point. It’s good to have an “emergency HSA fund” available on demand, in case you need it quickly. But in most cases, you can access invested HSA funds before you have to pay your medical bill(s), so maybe keep a smaller emergency fund than you need in order to maximize your investing potential.

No. 3 is sad but true. In some cases, your HSA trustee or custodian (just fancy words for the company that manages your HSA) hasn’t made it easy for you to invest your funds, or they haven’t given you options at all.

In this case, here’s all you need to know: Your HSA funds follow almost identical investing rules to traditional IRAs. You can invest funds from your HSA into an investment account that handles “normal” investments, like stocks, bonds, annuities, etc. You can’t invest in real property, like real estate or cars and boats. If you have returns on your investments and simply reinvest them, like an IRA, then you don’t pay taxes. Plus, if you do need to withdraw the funds from your HSA to pay for qualifying medical expenses, you don’t pay taxes then, either.

That’s about it. We’ll give you more investing tips but just wanted to put that one, simple piece of knowledge in your brain: yes, you can invest your HSA funds even if your current HSA provider has made it less than easy…just think about how you do it with your IRA. In fact, if you want to invest it the same place you currently have your IRA, go for it!

TMYK.

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By In Around the Web, Do the Math, Health Insurance

Employer Benefits Are Confusing. Duh.

As we have written about several times, getting benefits through your employer is essential to your FIRE plans but can also be very, very confusing. This article from a publication focused on brokers and consultants talks about exactly how confusing and frustrating it can be for you, the employee, to pick the right benefits for yourself and your family.

TL;DR: Only one in three of us feels like we’ve made the right decisions with our benefits selections — mainly because we haven’t been given the information we think will help us. As a result, we’re overly risk-averse.

Our advice is to do as much legwork as you can on your own. Put your analytical FI mind to work, build some spreadsheets, crunch some numbers, as your benefits administrator at your company loads and loads of questions. Then make your choices with more confidence. And if you find that your choices aren’t that great after all, let you benefits administrator know so that, hopefully, they’ll take your advice and do a better job for everyone the following year.

https://www.benefitspro.com/2019/06/12/confusion-and-risk-aversion-driving-poor-benefit-choices/?kw=Confusion%20and%20risk-aversion%20driving%20poor%20benefit%20choices&utm_source=email&utm_medium=enl&utm_campaign=bprodaily&utm_content=20190613&utm_term=bpro

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By In Around the Web, Prescription Drugs

How PBMs Work, or, Why Being an Active Health Care Consumer Is Both Hard and Necessary

I was sitting down to write something and then saw this thread on Twitter and decided, to hell with it, this is a brilliant dissection of how pharmacy benefit managers (PBM’s) work and why and how they’re contributing to high prices in health care.

There are several ways to read this thread. Certainly PBM’s are not practicing fairly and with consumers in mind. But their dance partner, insurance companies, are to blame as well for turning the other cheek to the “kickbacks” that the DJ, pharmaceutical companies, are paying the PBMs for promoting certain brand-named drugs over available (and much cheaper) generics.

This scenario is not an uncommon abstraction. In fact, I’m dealing with two similar scenarios right now:

1) a drug I’ve taken for 15 years isn’t covered through my pharmacy of choice, Walgreens, because my PBM is CVS Caremark.

Price to buy through CVS: $12
Price to buy through Walgreens: $421

2) A drug prescribed for my son that is not yet available in generic form costs $309 after the GoodRx discount. I don’t have any option other than to go without or take my chances on a different drug with different/more side effects.

I wrote about a similar type of phenomenon on my LinkedIn profile last week, with a link to the definition of a “Mexican standoff.” For the uninitiated, that’s when two or more people have guns pointed at each other and the only way out is mutually assured destruction…or working together. It’s a favorite movie trope of Quentin Tarantino, and it usually doesn’t end in cooperation.

Until the lords of health care figure out how to work together, it’s on us to look out for our own interests.

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By In Accident & Disability Insurance, Voluntary Benefits

Best Laid Plans Need Best Laid Plans

This stat, from the nonprofit Council for Disability Awareness, is a great reminder that it’s not only a good idea to have an emergency fund but to take a serious look at some kind of disability insurance. Maybe you’ll get your emergency fund to a point where insurance isn’t as critical. Until then, don’t forget to be multi-layered in your hedges against the unexpected.

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By In Financial Independence, General Benefits Knowledge

The Russian Proverb for Employee Benefits: Trust, but Verify

On my personal Twitter profile, I describe myself as a “progressive pragmatist and vice-versa.” What that means is that I tend to look at things optimistically but with a healthy dose of realism. I want things to go well. I want everyone (myself included) to be prosperous and feel important. But I know, from my own upbringing and experiences of family and friends, that positive thinking alone won’t overcome bad odds.

Why am I thinking so philosophically on a Thursday afternoon? Well, I’m sitting in Reagan National Airport — fun fact: “trust, but verify” was a favorite saying of his in relation, ironically, to the Russians, who originated the saying — after attending an event focused on employee benefits. I’ve been to a lot of these types of events and the mood at the more research-focused ones is generally somewhere between unbridled optimism and abject despair.

“The economy is great right now, unemployment is at an all-time low and benefits have never been more important!” 🥳

“Yeah but employees are paying more and have no idea how to use their benefits.” 😩

The thing is, both perspectives are a little bit right. That’s where you come in.

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By In Budgeting, Do the Math, Featured, Financial Independence, General Benefits Knowledge, Health Insurance

Congratulations, You’re FIRED! Health (and Health Coverage) Tips for Early Retirees

If you’re in the FIRE vanguard, retiring in your late 20s to mid-30s, you’re (hopefully) living the dream healthy enough to enjoy your retirement to its fullest. If you’ve planned your housing, transportation and other common living expenses well, they will be quite manageable within your budget until it’s time to shuffle off this mortal coil.

But keeping that coil tightly wrapped gets harder with each passing year. Don’t risk your financial health by compromising on your physical health — get insurance. And not just the cheapest insurance. Make sure it’s good enough that it doesn’t leave you with huge bills if something bad happens. Such decisions and expenses should all be part of your FI plan, even if it means a few extra years of saving to be fully prepared for a long, healthy life of early retirement freedom.

Here are some tips for that early retirement health care party…

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By In Financial Independence, Savings and Budgets

An Essential(ism) Approach to Financial Independence

I’m currently attending the DIG South Conference, which was created by my friends Stan and Sunny Gray, here in Charleston. It’s a fantastic event — so important to promoting new kinds of business in a South that could use it.

With those new kinds of business come new kinds of thinking about both business and personal goals. That’s where I found myself thinking about FI and FIRE as the opening keynote speaker Greg McKeown laid out his model for Essentialism. It should be a familiar idea if you are currently taking in the better wisdom of FI — you need to reduce and/or remove the unnecessary to truly be able to focus on your most important goals. You cut your needs to the essential. It was a simple message delivered with incredible enthusiasm and it really got me motivated.

(For anyone looking for a quick primer on McKeown’s thoughts on Essentialism, he did an episode of the Tim Ferriss podcast that’ll get you up to speed and motivate you as well.)

After the presentation, I got to chat with Greg a bit more and told him about the FI movement and he said something that I’ve been feeling that I’ll now share with you: while he saw the great value of setting goals to achieve financial independence at an early age, he wasn’t fully sold on the notion of retiring early.

“I don’t see myself ever ‘retiring’ because I’m doing something that I love and want to keep doing,” he said. In other words, he’s applied his essentialism practice to his career and found one that he wants to do, as opposed to having something for a period of time as a means to an end.

It’s a thought that I’ve had as well because I quite enjoy writing and consulting and hope that I’m doing it for a very long time to come. Likewise, I know my BofFI cofounder has become very busy in his “early retirement.” In fact, most of the people I see in the FI blogger community aren’t really retired at all, even if they say they are. They’ve simply found a way to gain financial independence and then “retire” from having others dictate their daily grind.

It resonated perfectly as I read more and more posts from smart, driven people who are convinced that they will be retired at 40, or 35, or 29. If you have that drive, then you will certainly not settle for whatever notion you may have in your mind of being retired to travel the world untethered to a dependent source of income for the remaining 40-70 years of your life. You’ll need to have something to keep you going. And if you find yourself doing well at cutting out the nonessential early in life, you’ll be able to do it again and again as you grow older. I think that’s ultimately what I took from McKeown’s presentation and comments — the ends don’t justify the means, it’s the means that will sustain you before, during and after your FIRE journey.

Now I’m off to read the book so I can soak in some more essentialism!

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